From Moliere to Bill Bryson
March 12, 2009

Recently I finished reading two completely different works.

One was a collection of plays by Moliere. Somewhere I had noted a reference to the fact that Moliere, the French playwright and actor, is considered to be one of the greatest masters of comedy in Western literature, so I decided that if he’s so good, it’s about time I read some of his work.

So I bought a used paperback of his plays online for one cent plus shipping! I read The School for Wives (his first great comedy and one of his best-loved), Tartuffe or The Hypocrite, Don Juan, and a few others. His characters are exaggerated, but what else would you expect in comedy?

The other book I read was A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson. Here Bryson covers the broad range of science, physics, space, astronomy, paleontology and nearly everything else. He does so in an engaging way, with humor. His section on subatomic physics, where things operate on rules radically different from the observable world we live in every day, is mind-boggling.

His worldview is naturalistic and atheistic, so I take exception to some of his conclusions, but I learned so much about…nearly everything!

Have you read Moliere or Bryson? What comments do you have?

London Journal – Friday, October 10, 2008
October 11, 2008

I have been to the Tower of Babel and am in ideological shock.

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